RE

Year 7

RETerms 1 & 2: How are we scholars of theology? – Scholars will study the nature of belief - Including asking themselves 'Why people believe?', 'Why do people pray?' and 'Why do people go to church?'. They will then look at the nature of God and Jesus. They will also begin to study different denominations within Christianity.

Terms 3 & 4: Origins of the universe and humanity – Scholars will look at various aspects of the universe and how humanity came to be. This will include: Creationism, Scientific Theories (e.g. the Big Bang) and Theistic Evolution. Scholars will then look at stewardship, dominion, animals and the environment through a study of Genesis 1 and 2.

Terms 5 & 6: The Fall – Scholars will study the origins and nature of sin, including Genesis 3. They will consider how sin may have come into the world, and the themes of evil and suffering. Scholars will also learn about the key concepts of atonement, forgiveness and reconciliation.

Year 8

Terms 1 & 2: Who is Jesus? Myth, Man or Deity? – Scholars will consider the historical and religious context of the man Jesus and will look at the life story of Jesus by engaging with the gospels. Particular focus will be paid to his miracles and parables. They will also look at Jesus' resurrection and mankind's salvation and atonement.

Terms 3 & 4: Abrahamic Faiths: Judaism – Scholars will study Judaism, with a focus on identity: Monotheism, Relationship with God, worship and the meaning of life. How Jews put their beliefs into practice will also be studied.

Terms 5 & 6: Abrahamic Faiths: Islam – Scholars will study Islam, with a focus on identity: Monotheism, Relationship with God, worship and the meaning of life. How Muslims put their beliefs into practice will also be studied.

Year 9

Terms 1 & 2: What are the main Eastern religions? – Scholars will study 2 of the main Eastern religions that originated in India; Hinduism and Buddhism. There will be a focus on their origins and history. Furthermore, ways in which they worship, rules for life, sacred texts, also their relationship with God and deities.

Terms 3, 4, 5 & 6:

Sikhism – Scholars will study Sikhism, with a particular focus on its origins, beliefs, worship, rules for life and Holy Scriptures. Scholars will also study alternatives to religion; Humanism and atheism.

Spiritual Experience and Faith at Work in the World – Scholars will study contemporary modern issues, while learning about the perspectives of different denominations and factions within faiths. Scholars will study how people put their faith and beliefs into practice in order to tackle inequalities in society.

Year 10

In Years 10 and 11 scholars will undertake studies in GCSE Religious Studies: AQA Specification A. They will focus on 2 religions throughout their studies: Judaism and Christianity.

Scholars and their families are invited to look at the AQA specification at the following link: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/religious-studies/gcse/religious-studies-a-8062

Terms 1 & 2: Scholars will focus on the unit of Jewish beliefs. They will complete 1 exam paper (5 questions) on this at the end of Year 11. They will learn to understand and explain common and divergent views within Judaism (Orthodox, Reform and Liberal). There will be a focus on the nature of G-d, Shechinah, life after death, resurrection and judgement, the nature and role of the Messiah. Scholars will also deepen their previous learning by studying the covenants, the promised land of Canaan, ten commandments, mitzvot and the sanctity of human life.

Terms 3 & 4: Scholars will focus on the unit of Jewish methods of worship  and practices. They will complete 1 exam paper (5 questions) on this at the end of Year 11. They will learn to understand and explain common and divergent views within Judaism (Orthodox, Reform and Liberal). There will be a focus on the synagogue, public and private acts of worship, the significance of prayer, including the Amidah. Practices and rituals such as Shabbat, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Pesach, Brit Milah, Bar and Bat Mitzvah, marriage and mourning ceremonies will be covered. The significance of the Tenakh and Talmud will be examined, oral and written laws, even dietary laws.

Terms 5 & 6: Scholars will look at the main religious tradition in Great Britain today, which is Christianity. Scholars will study the beliefs, teachings and practices of Christianity. As well as, common and divergent views within Christianity in the way beliefs and teachings are understood. Scholars may refer to a range of different Christian perspectives in their answers including Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant. There will be emphasis on the nature of God, different Christian beliefs about the afterlife and their importance, including resurrection and life after death; judgement, heaven and hell. Study will continue to deepen their knowledge of the incarnation and Jesus as the Son of God, the crucifixion, resurrection and ascension, the means of salvation, including law, grace and Spirit, the role of Christ in salvation including the idea of atonement.

Scholars will end Year 10 studying the way in which Christians put their belief into practice: different forms of worship, prayer and its significance, including the Lord’s Prayer, set prayers and informal prayer, the role and meaning of the sacraments, the role and importance of pilgrimage and celebrations in Britain today.

Year 11

Terms 1, 2, 3 & 4:

All scholars will consider the key theological question: What are the different religious teachings, and religious, philosophical and ethical arguments, relating to the issues that follow, and their impact and influence in the modern world?

There will be a particular focus on different Christian perspectives, however other religious points of view will also be considered. Key question: What are the contrasting perspectives in contemporary British society on all of these issues?

Theme A - Relationships and families

Sex, marriage and divorce

  • Human sexuality including: heterosexual and homosexual relationships.
  • Sexual relationships before and outside of marriage
  • Contraception and family planning
  • The nature and purpose of marriage.
  • Same-sex marriage and cohabitation
  • Divorce, including reasons for divorce, and remarrying.
  • Ethical arguments related to divorce, including those based on the sanctity of marriage vows and compassion.
  • The nature of families including: the role of parents and children, extended families and the nuclear family.
  • The purpose of families, including: procreation, stability and the protection of children, educating children in a faith.
  • Contemporary family issues including: same-sex parents and polygamy.
  • The roles of men and women: Gender equality, Gender prejudice and discrimination including examples.

Families and gender equality

  • The nature of families including: the role of parents and children, extended families and the nuclear family.

Theme B – Religion and Life

The origins and value of the universe, including:

  • Religious teachings about the origins of the universe, and different interpretations of these
  • The relationship between scientific views, such as the Big Bang theory, and religious views.
  • The value of the world and the duty of human beings to protect it, including religious teaching about stewardship, dominion, responsibility, awe and wonder.
  • The use and abuse of the environment, including the use of natural resources, pollution.
  • The use and abuse of animals, including: • animal experimentation • the use of animals for food.

The origins and value of human life, including:

  • Religious teachings about the origins of human life, and different interpretations of these
  • The relationship between scientific views, such as evolution, and religious views.
  • The concepts of sanctity of life and the quality of life.
  • Abortion, including situations when the mother's life is at risk.
  • Ethical arguments related to abortion, including those based on the sanctity of life and quality of life.
  • Euthanasia.
  • Beliefs about death and an afterlife, and their impact on beliefs about the value of human life.

Theme D – Peace and Conflict

Religion, violence, terrorism and war

The meaning and significance of:

  • Peace
  • Justice
  • Forgiveness
  • Reconciliation.

Violence, including violent protest:

  • Terrorism
  • Reasons for war, including greed, self-defence and retaliation
  • The just war theory, including the criteria for a just war
  • Holy war
  • Pacifism

Religion and belief in 21st century conflict

Religion and belief as a cause of war and violence in the contemporary world:

  • Nuclear weapons, including nuclear deterrence
  • The use of weapons of mass destruction
  • Religion and peace-making in the contemporary world including the work of individuals influenced by religious teaching
  • Religious responses to the victims of war including the work of one present day religious organisation.

Theme F – Human Rights and Social Justice

  • Human rights

Prejudice and discrimination in religion and belief, including the status and treatment within religion of women and homosexuals. Issues of equality, freedom of religion and belief including freedom of religious expression. Human rights and the responsibilities that come with rights, including the responsibility to respect the rights of others. Social justice. Racial prejudice and discrimination. Ethical arguments related to racial discrimination (including positive discrimination), including those based on the ideals of equality and justice.

  • Wealth and poverty

Wealth, including:  the right attitude to wealth,  the uses of wealth. The responsibilities of wealth, including the duty to tackle poverty and its causes. Exploitation of the poor including issues relating to: fair pay, excessive interest on loans, people-trafficking. The responsibilities of those living in poverty to help themselves overcome the difficulties they face. Charity, including issues related to giving money to the poor.

Terms 5 & 6: Scholars will revise and prepare for the GCSE exam.

There will be 2 separate exam dates for RE issued by the exam board. Each exam session will be 1 hour and 45 minutes. They will be examined on the following:

Component 1: Study of religions – Judaism and Christianity

  • Jewish Beliefs
  • Jewish Practices
  • Christian Beliefs
  • Christian Practices

Component 2: Thematic Studies

  • Theme A - Relationships and families
  • Theme B – Religion and Life
  • Theme D – Peace and Conflict
  • Theme F – Human Rights and Social Justice